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Uniforms a hit with WA employees

By Rhys Prka

A RECENT survey of 1000 Australians in full or part-time work has revealed more than 16 per cent of men and 10 per cent of women would only apply for a job if the company had a modern and stylish uniform.

According to the report, which was conducted by YouGov Galaxy on behalf of uniform design company Cargo Crew, Western Australia currently has the highest population wearing a uniform to work, with 56 per cent of the workforce wearing one.

“This indicated to us that a modern, stylish uniform can be a missed opportunity for progressive businesses that want to attract young people entering the workforce,” Cargo Crew Founder and Creative Director Felicity Rodgers said.

The study found only one per cent of respondents said they would not take a job if it meant wearing a uniform to work.

Ms Rogers said uniforms presented young Australians with the perfect combination of savings and the ease of not needing to decide what to wear to work.

“It’s a cost-saving measure for them,” she said. “Not having to invest as much in their own work wardrobe would be an advantage when starting your career.”

Over 68 per cent of women who responded to the study said they were happy to wear a uniform to work because they wouldn’t have to worry about buying their own work clothes, compared to just over half of men.

It’s not only job seekers who are fond of a work uniform, however. The study showed 97 per cent of Western Australian respondents preferred when a store had a work uniform and that 93 per cent of Australians believed a uniform reflected well on a company’s image.

Considering this, it came as no surprise that 93 per cent of 18-24-year-old respondents and 79 per cent of over-50s had worn or were currently wearing a uniform for work.

“A modern, stylish uniform can be a missed opportunity for progressive businesses that want to attract young people entering the workforce.”

Ms Rodgers said well-designed work uniforms served a functional purpose as well, making employees more comfortable and relaxed in the workplace. “It’s really about balancing the aesthetics along with the functionality, she said.

“For example, when we’re designing shirts we make sure the length of the shirt is longer so if people are bending over they are not feeling like they are exposing their backs.

“I personally believe staff being easily identified, particularly in a service-based industry, is great for customers, a lot of whom get frustrated when they can’t locate who works in the business.

“One of our clients, Freedom Furniture, has a big floor space, so being able to locate the staff and identify who they are is important in those kinds of retail environments.

“Uniforms are becoming more and more important for businesses.”

Article originally publish The West Australian, Employment, Saturday 17th November, 2018.